Return to FDB – the main new feature of the Arctic P12 Max White

Arctic P12 Max White

Arctic has released a new, white version of the P12 Max fan. However, it is not only a choice between light (P12 Max White) and dark (P12 Max Black), but also between different types of bearings, fluid dynamic and ball ones. In any case, it is once again a 120 mm fan that will be taking the top ranks in comparison tests with its performance characteristics. It has all the prerequisites to do so.

The black P12 Max fan has been joined by a white one. It is also of the 120mm format and is also built on the same impeller geometry with five blades that have distinctly curved leading edges. And although there are fewer blades, there’s an extra-large surface area per blade, so the gaps between the blades are such that the fan still achieves high static pressure and is therefore efficient even on more restrictive obstacles.

Given the comparable cross-section (impeller and hub) and geometry (including the vibration-suppressing hoop on the blade tips) to the P12 ARGB, similar results can be expected here, although due to the use of a different material for the impeller, the noise performance of the P12 White will be more or less different at some frequencies. This is also due to the use of a different, more powerful motor. With the P12 White, it should be pointed out that the max speed is supposed to be as high as 3,300 rpm. With the latter, it will most certainly be a fan with one of the highest airflows you’ll find in “PC” models. Arctic states 137.69 m³/h and it should be around that figure in practice as well.

The advertised static pressure is 4.35 mm H2O. Its values make sense considering the fan design at a super-high speed. The performance parameters are listed the same as for the black P12 Max variant.

There is one change compared to it, however, and that is the bearings. Instead of double-ball (P12 Max Black), there are (in the P12 Max White) fluid ones. It is therefore the same situation as between the variants with CO (ball bearings) and without it (FDB), except that here you are guided by the colour design when it comes to the bearings. You’ll find out which type of bearings is quieter later from our tests when it’s the turn of these fans.

The suggested price for one Arctic P12 Max fan is 14,49 EUR, but in reality it sells cheaper in stores. On Amazon or Ebay for around 12 EUR. The fans are already in stock and available.

English translation and edit by Jozef Dudáš


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One comment Add comment

  1. I think Arctic do this because the complain of some user with the black variant claiming there were a noise/coil due to the ball bearing, at least for me there is no such a thing rather than the jet noise at high rpm but at 1800 or lower is not any noise.

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