Test of “chewing gums”: 3× Arctic and Thermal Grizzly Minus Pads

Details and test procedures

Thermal conductive pads are useful wherever a thermal paste cannot be reasonably applied. A good example are power supply circuit of graphics cards and processors, so the choice of test subjects was unambiguous. It was less clear, however, what thickness of pads is most effective, if it is better to pay for more expensive ones, and what improvement to expect.

Details

Heating of voltage regulators does not determine just lifespan, but also stability of the system. And we do not even have to think about extremes – it is enough to demand a high performance and low noise level at the same time. The final result can be improved with each Celsius degree.

We have ordered probably the most popular thermal conducting pads for this test – from Arctic. They can be characterized by a relatively low price and great expectations. The manufacturer states on the website that they are significantly more effective than Phobya pads. They come in two sizes (we will be interested in the most common, for one or two uses – 50 × 50 mm) and in three thicknesses: 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mm. We have tested all of them.

Arctic has quite rich specifications on the web, from which you can get a pretty good idea about properties of the material. Thermal conductivity (6 W/mK) and thermal load (-40 ~ +200 ºC) are the key attributes for a better orientation. The opponent from Thermal Grizzly, Minus Pad, should work well in frost (up to -100 ºC) too, making it attractive for extreme overclocking. The upper limit is also somewhat higher (+ 250 ° C), but difficult to fully exploit in real situations. In addition to the higher thermal range and thermal conductivity (8 W/mK), the price is also higher. It costs about 15 € (120 × 20 mm), which is few times more than an Arctic pad with comparable size and thickness.

Thermal Grizzly revealed its composition too – ceramic silicon and nano-aluminum. As well as Arctic pads, they have a relatively low elasticity and higher stiffness. On the other hand, default pads of our test motherboard, Gigabyte Aorus AX370 Gaming 5, are more flexible with lower density.

Test procedures

We measured the temperatures in the CPU Vcore section (the next SOC circuit is heating half less) and subtracted them from four different sources. The first is the internal sensor on the board, the second is just above the base of the heatsink, where we installed a thermocouple, and the remaining two are surface temperatures captured via our thermal imager. Through Fluke SmartView, we were looking for maximum and average temperatures. Except for the temperatures from the internal sensor, the higher the temperature, the better (the more the pad transfers the heat into the heatsink).

   

In order to test pads properly, Vcore was set to 1.45 V (R7 1800X with 4.03 GHz). This time, tests took place in an open space on a benchtable, but with the powerful airflow of two Nocua NF-A12S fans with max. RPM (~ 1200). You can see the layout in the photo. As usual, we tested with constant air temperature 21 –  21.3 ºC. The burn was simulated in IntelBurnTest (12 GB) for 900 seconds.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Flattr this!

Low profile in a larger, 140 mm body. Arctic’s P14 Slim

As the cross section of fans increases, the thickness usually grows. For cases where the opposite is desired, i.e. a large yet thin fan, Arctic has “squeezed” the P14 down to 16mm. This is one of the few fans with such proportions and this one has ambitions to be a cut above the rest of the range. Compared to the one number smaller P12 Slim model, the increase in airflow at the same noise level should be almost 24 %. Read more “Low profile in a larger, 140 mm body. Arctic’s P14 Slim” »

  •  
  •  
  •  

Arctic BioniX P120 A-RGB: The lit specialist for filters and grilles

Now that’s what we call a turnaround. Remember how the BioniX F120 failed on obstacles? The newer BioniX P120 (A-RGB) no longer has such a fundamental limitation. On the contrary, it is significantly less stifled by obstacles than many competing fans. Just tame those vibrations, fine-tune the acoustics, where there are some flaws, and it’ll be great. The basis (the rotor) is better in practice than the label parameters suggest. Read more “Arctic BioniX P120 A-RGB: The lit specialist for filters and grilles” »

  •  
  •  
  •  

Arctic Freezer 7 X rev. 3: The cooling legend that missed the boat

How many generations of processors could the Freezer 7 cool? The most. No other brand of coolers has been around for so long. That’s worthy of respect, but the fact remains that the progression in efficiency is rapid from revision to revision. Some improvements do come, but at a slower rate than competing solutions that are way more cost-effective. Thus, Freezer 7 often reaches the shelves of brick-and-mortar stores and PC builds only by inertia. Read more “Arctic Freezer 7 X rev. 3: The cooling legend that missed the boat” »

  •  
  •  
  •  

Comments (3) Add comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *