CAMM2 memory modules for desktop are closer than it seemed

While we focused on the new processor architectures most, Computex 2024 featured all sorts of things. One of these is worth revisiting. We’ve written several times recently about the hypothetical possibility of desktop motherboards switching to CAMM2 memory modules instead of the DIMMs that have been standard for almost thirty years. It seems that this is much closer to reality than it seemed, CAMM2 is indeed coming to desktop. Read more “CAMM2 memory modules for desktop are closer than it seemed” »

MSI’s first motherboard using new CAMM2 memory

Some time ago, we reported that CAMM2 (or LPCAMM2) compression memory modules could be extended from laptops to desktops in the future, where they could improve performance or enable the use of LPDDR-type memory. Now there is even talk that may move desktop processors from using DDR6 to LPDDR6 memory. MSI has shown what this could look like, and has already shown the first prototype motherboard for CAMM2 memory. Read more “MSI’s first motherboard using new CAMM2 memory” »

End of DDR3 memory, old PC upgrades to get costlier. Because of AI

HBM2, HBM3 etc. to be rare memory used on expensive server and compute hardware in low volumes. But the boom of AI accelerators (like Nvidia’s GPUs) suddenly catapulted the technology into a highly desirable component, now accounting for large percentages of total DRAM production. This is going to be at the expense of legacy RAM – a large portion of the lines previously producing DDR3 memory have reportedly switched to HBM. Read more “End of DDR3 memory, old PC upgrades to get costlier. Because of AI” »

Caveat: RGB LEDs can damage graphics cards and other hardware

A curious “scandal” has now surfaced on the Internet: it seems that decorative RGB LEDs in your computer may not be a purely cosmetic feature that has no effect on the hardware. Users on social media have noticed that the illumination can leave an irreversible mark on your hardware, so to speak, such as on a graphics card that you have next to your RGB memory. Whether this can also have adverse effects on users is hard to say. Read more “Caveat: RGB LEDs can damage graphics cards and other hardware” »

Stacked DRAM on the horizon. Could be a revolution like 3D NAND

DRAM used in operating memory has long been experiencing problems. It doesn’t have the best scaling to new manufacturing nodes, which limits capacity growth. Things used to be similar with 15nm NAND Flash, the last gen  before planar technology was replaced by 3D NAND. That literally breathed new life (or at least TBWs) into SSDs. However, a stacked “3D” version is now shaping up for DRAM as well, giving hopes it could be similarly groundbreaking. Read more “Stacked DRAM on the horizon. Could be a revolution like 3D NAND” »

GDDR7 memory for next-gen GPUs is ready, up to 48GHz clocks

Nvidia’s new generation of graphics cards, GeForce RTX 5000, and upcoming cards from AMD (Radeon RX 8000) and Intel are likely planned to use new GDDR7 graphics memory technology to deliver better bandwidth than both GDDR6 and GDDR6X. This technology has now been finalized by the JEDEC consortium and will allow effective speeds of up to 48 GHz, so there will be significant increases in bandwidth, up to 2–3× compared to current GPUs. Read more “GDDR7 memory for next-gen GPUs is ready, up to 48GHz clocks” »

256GB RAM: 64GB DDR5 modules coming, motherboards are ready

Early this year DDR5 memory modules got capacity boost when 24GB and 48GB modules hit the market. These were based on 24Gb chips. However, it looks like another leap is coming and 64GB modules could soon be on the market, allowing up to 256GB of RAM to be installed into regular desktop PCs, or 128GB for laptops or Mini-ITX boards. Board manufacturers are already gearing up support, hopefully this time there won’t be compatibility issues. Read more “256GB RAM: 64GB DDR5 modules coming, motherboards are ready” »

After SSDs, RAM prices are going up too, particularly DDR5

A month ago, we published a report here that prices of SSDs (or NAND memory, which is their main component) have stopped their previous price fall and instead, their prices have started to climb up. Unfortunately, it seems that we have to follow with the news that the the pricing of the second key type of memory for computers, which is DRAM, is taking a turn for the worse as well and DDR5 and DDR4 modules will get more expensive too. Read more “After SSDs, RAM prices are going up too, particularly DDR5” »

More (V)RAM: Micron plans bigger GDDR7 and DDR5 chips

With the GeForce RTX 4060 Ti 16GB, there has been discussion that most GPUs won’t get double memory capacity until larger chips come to market. But that seems to be happening. Micron’s roadmap how shows higher capacity DRAM chips. These will be larger DDR5 chips, which will enable 256GB RAM sizes in a regular PC. But there are also plans for larger GDDR7 chips, which will allow memory capacity on graphics cards to be raised. Read more “More (V)RAM: Micron plans bigger GDDR7 and DDR5 chips” »

24GB/48GB DDR5 modules don’t work with Ryzen CPUs, fix coming?

In the past, Intel processors could not run newer higher-capacity DDR2 and DDR3 modules, while AMD processors worked. That’s why we were sort of assuming that the currently appearing DDR5 modules with unusual “non-binary” capacities would just automatically work on AMD platforms. But that’s not true, it seems that they only work with Intel processors for now and Ryzen 7000s will only be able to use them after a future update. Read more “24GB/48GB DDR5 modules don’t work with Ryzen CPUs, fix coming?” »

AMD Zen 5 will have 16-core CCX and other architecture news

Last week we wrote about leaked information on AMD’s Zen 5 processor architecture, published on the RedGamingTech youtube channel. Such information tends to be of rumor nature, so it should probably be treated with caution for now. However, the details this source gives are quite interesting, and now they have added some more specifics, so it is worthy to cover them, even if we have to keep in mind to not take it for granted. Read more “AMD Zen 5 will have 16-core CCX and other architecture news” »

Future of memory tech: Samsung on DDR6, GDDR7 and GDDR6+

DDR5 memory modules for PCs have arrived on the market only recently so their replacement should be many years away (the span between the introduction of DDR4 and DDR5 has been more than seven years). But Samsung, as one of the main memory modules producers, has now announced more distant plans for the successors of the DDR5 memory (DDR6), but also new graphic memory, to replace GDDR6 and GDDR6X at the Tech Day 2021 conference. Read more “Future of memory tech: Samsung on DDR6, GDDR7 and GDDR6+” »

Top DDR5 speeds? Currently at 6666, with 7000 MHz soon to follow

Last week saw the reviews and launch of Alder Lake CPU and LGA 1700 mainboards. A big new feature of this platform is DDR5 memory allowing for a higher bandwidth, albeit potentially suffering from higher initial prices. Following the premiere of Alder Lake, we took a look at what’s the fastest available memory modules you can get. It looks like memory modules running on 7000MHz for PCs could be here sooner than later. Read more “Top DDR5 speeds? Currently at 6666, with 7000 MHz soon to follow” »

Alder Lake testing toolkit: the MEG Z690 Unify and DDR5 memory

We already have one of the Alder Lake processors in our editorial office and this time we’ll be quick – we’ll publish the full tests at the earliest possible date, November 4. Until then, we have to keep quiet about the features of Intel’s new processors. But we can already give you a little teaser with a preview of the platform we’re testing on. In the article you will also find a thermal image of the VRM of the MSI MEG Z690 Unify motherboard. Read more “Alder Lake testing toolkit: the MEG Z690 Unify and DDR5 memory” »

Hynix already has HBM3. Clocks up to 6.4GHz with huge bandwidth

GDDR7 is still far in the future (though Nvidia got ahead with their own Micron-made GDDR6X). But high-performance GPUs could get another new memory technology in the near future: HBM3 chips. Hynix has now announced that it has developed the first generation of this memory, which could lift graphics bandwidth by almost an order of magnitude. A single HBM3 chip (package) has a bandwidth higher than the entire RTX 3080. Read more “Hynix already has HBM3. Clocks up to 6.4GHz with huge bandwidth” »